In Balearic In Vitro Fertilization Center (CEFIVBA), Palma de Mallorca (Spain) we have a shared desire with our patients, we would like to be able to get all our patients get pregnant and to achieve their dream of creating a family. Since 1985 we have been working hard and struggling to make it happen.

Although we know it can be an unattainable Dream, we work with illusion, but we are aware of the difficulties.

For this reason we have an advantageous deal for our patients in order to facilitate access to Assited Reproduction Techniques in Spain and benefit from the advances and benefits that they give to couples with difficulty to conceive by their own.

WE FINANCE YOUR TREATMENTS

At 12 months WITHOUT INTEREST

If you are interested, you can make an appointment by calling +34 971 918 045, where we will attend and will inform you about any questions. Or send an e-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Artificial Inseminaction

For a woman to get pregnant, a man’s sperm must travel from the vagina through the cervix (narrow, lower part of the womb), into the uterus (womb), and up into one of the fallopian tubes. If sperm arrives in the tubes soon after the release of the egg from the ovary (ovulation), the sperm and egg can meet in the tube, most commonly, on the side that ovulation took place, and then fertilization may occur.

Because the cervix naturally limits the number of sperm that enter the uterus, only a few sperm actually make their way to the fallopian tubes. Artificial insemination is a procedure that bypasses the cervix and places sperm into a woman’s uterus around the time of ovulation. Placing the sperm directly into the uterus makes the trip to the fallopian tubes much shorter. This way, there is a better chance that more sperm will make their way closer to the egg. This procedure is performed to improve a woman’s chance of getting pregnant.

When is Artificial insemination helpful?

There are many reasons why couples experience difficulty having a baby. Artificial insemination may be useful for some of them.

Female infertility. Women who do not release an egg regularly (ovulate) may take medications to help them ovulate regularly. These women may need Artificial insemination to time insemination at about the same time as ovulation. Also, Artificial insemination is helpful when a woman’s cervix has scarring that prevents the sperm from entering the uterus from the vagina. This may be seen in women who have had surgery on their cervix (cryosurgery, cone biopsy, LEEP, etc.).

Infertile women sometimes take medications (by mouth or as an injection) that cause their ovaries to produce several eggs at once. These women appear to have a better chance of getting pregnant if they also have Artificial insemination.

Male infertility. Artificial insemination is most commonly used when the male partner has a low sperm count or if the movement of the sperm (motility) is less than ideal. But also, Artificial insemination is useful for couples that are infertile because the male has problems developing an erection or being able to ejaculate. For example, retrograde ejaculation is when the sperm are released backwards into the bladder, instead of through the penis, at the time of male orgasm. A number of medical conditions can cause retrograde ejaculation. Sperm ejaculated into the bladder can be taken from urine and used for Artificial insemination. Also, Artificial insemination may help if the man has an abnormal urethral opening (opening of the penis).

Fertility preservation. Men may collect and freeze (cryopreserve) their sperm for future use before having a vasectomy, testicular surgery, or radiation/chemotherapy treatment for cancer. The sperm can then be used later for Artificial insemination.

Third party reproduction. Artificial insemination is performed when couples use sperm from a man who is not the woman’s partner to have a baby. This is called donor insemination (DI). DI is commonly performed when the male partner’s sperm quality is so severely damaged that his sperm shouldn’t be used for conception and in vitro fertilization is not an option. DI can also be used if the man has certain genetic diseases that he does not want to pass on to his children. Single women or lesbian couples who want to have a baby may also consider DI.

How are sperm collected?

The sperm needed for Artificial insemination can be collected in several ways. Most commonly, the man masturbates into a plastic cup that is provided by the doctor’s office or andrology laboratory, a laboratory that specializes in dealing with male health issues. Sperm can also be collected during sex in a special condom that the doctor provides. If a man has retrograde ejaculation, the sperm can be retrieved in the laboratory from urine he has collected.

Men who have a difficult time with erection or ejaculation despite using medications, as well as men with a spinal cord injury, may be able to produce a sperm sample with the help of procedures such as vibratory stimulation or electroejaculation.

How is Artificial insemination done?

Once collected, the semen sample is then “washed” in the laboratory, to concentrate the sperm and remove the seminal fluid (seminal fluid can cause severe cramping in the woman). This process can take up to two hours to complete.

Artificial insemination is performed near the time that the female partner is ovulating. The Artificial insemination procedure is relatively simple and only takes a few minutes. The woman lies on an examining table and the clinician inserts a speculum into her vagina to see her cervix. A catheter (narrow tube) is inserted through the cervix into the uterus and the washed semen sample is slowly injected. Usually this procedure is quite painless, but some women have mild cramps.

Does it work?

The success of Artificial insemination depends on the cause of the couple’s infertility. It works best for men when the majority of their sperm does not move and for women whose cervix prevents sperm from entering their uterus. It does not work as well for men who produce fewer sperm. It also does not help women who have severe fallopian tube disease, moderate to severe endometriosis, or a history of pelvic (lower belly) infections. Other fertility treatments are better for these patients.

Overall, if inseminations are performed monthly with fresh or frozen sperm, success rates can be as high as 20% per cycle depending on whether fertility medications are used, age of the female partner, and infertility diagnosis, as well as other facts that could impact the success of the cycle.

Are there risks?

If a woman is taking fertility medications when she has Artificial insemination, her chance of getting pregnant with twins, triplets or more is greater than if she were not taking fertility medications. The chance of birth defects in all children is 2% to 4%. Undergoing an Artificial insemination does not increase that risk. The risk of developing an infection after an Artificial insemination is small.

Talk with ours especialists to find out if Artificial insemination is appropriate for you.You can contact with us or send us a e-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Reed More in ASRM

A nice video of a pregnancy in 90 seconds

Men’s diets, in particular the amount and type of different fats they eat, could be associated with their semen quality according to the results of a study published online in Europe’s leading reproductive medicine journal Human Reproduction "Dietary fat and semen quality among men attending a fertility clinic"

The study of 99 men in the USA found an association between a high total fat intake and lower total sperm count and concentration. It also found that men who ate more omega-3 polyunsaturated fats (the type of fat often found in fish and plant oils) had better formed sperm than men who ate less.

However, the researchers warn that this is a small study, and its findings need to be replicated by further research in order to be sure about the role played by fats on men’s fertility. Professor Jill Attaman, who was a Clinical and Research Fellow in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at Massachusetts General Hospital and an Instructor in Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology at Harvard Medical School at the time of the research [2], said: “In the meantime, if men make changes to their diets so as to reduce the amount of saturated fat they eat and increase their omega-3 intake, then this may not only improve their general health, but could improve their reproductive health too. At a global level, adopting these lifestyle modifications may improve general health, as high saturated fat diets are known to be a risk factor for a range of cardiovascular diseases; but, in addition, our research suggests that it could be beneficial for reproductive health worldwide.”

A number of previous studies have investigated the link between body mass index (BMI) and semen quality, with mixed results. However, little is known about the potential role of dietary fats and semen quality, and so Prof Attaman and her colleagues set out to investigate it in men attending a fertility clinic.

Between December 2006 and August 2010 they questioned the men about their diet and analysed samples of their semen; they also measured levels of fatty acids in sperm and seminal plasma in 23 of the 99 men taking part.

The men were divided into three groups according to the amount of fats they consumed. Those in the third with the highest fat intake had a 43% lower total sperm count and 38% lower sperm concentration than men in the third with the lowest fat intake. “Total sperm count” is defined as the total number of sperm in the ejaculate, while ”sperm concentration” is defined as the concentration of sperm (number per unit volume). The World Health Organisation provides a definition of “normal” total sperm count and concentration as follows: the total number of spermatozoa in the ejaculate should be at least 39 million; the concentration of spermatozoa should be at least 15 million per ml.

The study found that the relationship between dietary fats and semen quality was largely driven by the consumption of saturated fats. Men consuming the most saturated fats had a 35% lower total sperm count than men eating the least, and a 38% lower sperm concentration. “The magnitude of the association is quite dramatic and provides further support for the health efforts to limit consumption of saturated fat given their relation with other health outcomes such as cardiovascular disease,” said Prof Attaman.

Men consuming the most omega-3 fats had slightly more sperm (1.9%) that were correctly formed than men in the third that had the lowest omega-3 intake.

Of note: 71% of all the men in the study were overweight or obese, and the health effects of this could also affect semen quality. However, the researchers made allowances for this. “We were able to isolate the independent effects of fat intake from those of obesity using statistical models,” said Prof Attaman. “Notably, the frequency of overweight and obesity among men in this study does not differ much from that among men in the general population in the USA (74%).”

The study is subject to a number of limitations that could affect the results; for instance, the use of a food frequency questionnaire might not accurately reflect men’s actual diets, and only one semen sample per man was collected. The authors point out that studies like theirs cannot show that dietary fats cause poor semen quality, only that there is an association between the two.

“To our knowledge, this is the largest study to date examining the influence of specific dietary fats on male fertility,” they write. But they conclude: “Given the limitations of the current study, in particular the fact that it is a cross-sectional analysis and that it is the first report of a relation between dietary fat and semen quality, it is essential that these findings be reproduced in future work.”

Prof Attaman and her colleagues are continuing to investigate how dietary and lifestyle factors influence fertility in men and women as well as the treatment outcomes of couples undergoing fertility treatment.

More in Eshre.

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital say they have extracted stem cells from human ovaries and made them generate egg cells. The advance, if confirmed, might provide a new source of eggs for treating infertility, though scientists say it is far too early to tell if the work holds such promise.

Read the Full article.

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